healthcare compliance and credentialing

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Jan Laws

Jan Laws is a member of the Product Management team at symplr. She holds both CPMSM and CPCS certification distinctions through NAMSS. Prior to joining CACTUS/symplr, Jan served for more than 20 years in the Medical Staff Services field. Her experience includes roles in centralized verification organizations’ operations, medical staff management in both system and single hospital organizations, and provider credentialing. Jan eagerly shares her expertise through learning experiences that enhance the positive collaboration between symplr teams and our clients. In addition to her expertise in medical staff services, Jan is a licensed professional counselor who operates a successful private practice.

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Healthcare Provider Credentialing | Provider Credentialing | Nurse Credentialing

Best Practices for an Effective Compliance Program in a Healthcare Facility

By: Jan Laws
October 26th, 2018

Hospitals are increasingly challenged by healthcare compliance laws and changing regulatory standards. Healthcare institutions need to continually evaluate their hospital’s compliance training, technology adoption, and delivery of care while simultaneously balancing staff shortages, privacy and security concerns, and their ability to meet accreditation standards.

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Healthcare Provider Credentialing | Medical Staff Services | Provider Credentialing

Top 3 Reasons that Errors Occur During Provider Credentialing

By: Jan Laws
October 23rd, 2018

Negligent credentialing puts patients at risk and exposes hospitals, healthcare facilities, and urgent care centers to significant legal liability.

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Healthcare Provider Credentialing | Medical Staff Services | Provider Credentialing

Most Common Provider Credentialing Errors and Real Life Cases to Learn From

By: Jan Laws
October 18th, 2018

Preventing medical errors that can jeopardize patient safety is a constant challenge within the healthcare industry. Hospital and urgent care center staff, especially, are under incredible pressure to make sure that their providers are competent and capable practitioners, providing the best care possible.

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Medical Staff Services | Provider Management

Medical Staff Office Structure: How to Improve Office Performance & Productivity

By: Jan Laws
October 16th, 2018

Your Medical Staff Office (MSO) is the hub where patients, providers, and regulations meet. Many medical staff offices center around working efficiently to manage providers and following policies and procedures to ensure your operations remain compliant. How can you ensure that your staff stays efficient and doesn’t waste time and resources? Strong performance starts with tightly managing and enhancing the four areas many MSOs struggle with.

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Patient Care | Telemedicine | Provider Privileging | Healthcare

Defining telemedicine, telehealth, telecare and its role in patient care

By: Jan Laws
July 24th, 2018

You may have heard the terms Telemedicine, telehealth, or telecare. Sound like Greek to you?

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Provider Management | Provider Privileging | Healthcare Provider Credentialing | Provider Credentialing

The Importance of Primary Source Verification in Provider Credentialing

By: Jan Laws
May 15th, 2018

Why Primary Source Verification is Critical When considering a new physician for your staff, ensuring the accuracy of the information and documentation they provide during the credentialing process is critical. A typical practitioner applying for a staff position needs to provide a considerable amount of information – licensure, certifications, education details, references, etc – and it's incumbent upon the credentialing professional to ensure every item and statement is as it appears to be.

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