healthcare compliance and credentialing

symplr Blog

Articles to make governance, risk, & compliance the simplest part of your day.

Tracey Meyer

Tracey Meyer is responsible for all symplr software product management, and was in the Cactus Software product development group for 2 years before being selected to helm the product management team for symplr. She brings 20 years of business and technical software experience building products to simplify and enhance the user experience for her clients.

Blog Feature

Peer Review Software

Immunity and Confidentiality: The Legal Significance of Peer Review

By: Tracey Meyer
July 20th, 2016

For most healthcare organizations, conducting medical staff peer reviews is a central component of quality management. The majority of insurance companies, accreditors, and regulatory bodies require consistent peer review as part of the credentialing process. Although peer review is widely practiced as an industry standard, its implications are often misunderstood. 

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vendor credentialing | Vendor Credentialing Services

Four Common Myths About the Accreditation Process

By: Tracey Meyer
July 15th, 2016

In the medical industry, quality of care is measured through a series of accreditation processes by independent surveyors. These checks are designed to ensure that policies, procedures, processes, and outcomes are all held to acceptable standards by stakeholders, such as insurance groups and regulatory agencies like The Joint Commission. Most accreditation agencies use the widely respected and accepted framework form ISO 9001 because of its emphasis on risk management.

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symplyr top blog posts of 2017

Top 10 Posts of 2017

It's packed with valuable insights to make governance, risk, and compliance the simplest part of your day.

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Visitor Management | Hospital Safety | Hospital Security

Hospital Security is Everyone's Responsibility

By: Tracey Meyer
July 13th, 2016

With violent crime on the rise in hospitals across the country – and with the ever-present threat of active shootings in public facilities – today’s hospitals are implementing new systems and processes designed to deter the threat of violence. Preparation and prevention involves everything from active shooter training to high-tech visitor management systems, but one of the most important prevention mechanisms is vigilant employees. Hospital safety, after all, is everyone’s job.

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Healthcare Provider Credentialing

4 Challenges to Implementing OPPE

By: Tracey Meyer
May 25th, 2016

No doubt, the Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluation (OPPE) is meant to be a valuable screening tool to ensure care provided by practitioners does not fall below an acceptable level. As a major priority created in 2007 by the Joint Commission, the OPPE is designed to ensure quality of care and safety for patients – an essential part of the credentialing process.

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Healthcare Provider Credentialing

The Growing Telemedicine Market and Ensuring Quality of Care

By: Tracey Meyer
May 17th, 2016

Twenty years ago, the idea of having 24/7 access to a board-certified physician who could diagnose and treat common illnesses via a computer was a pipe dream. Thanks to legislation and advancing technology, telemedicine has become an increasingly popular option for lowering healthcare cost without compromising quality. It has also made it a much more marketable option – especially for patients and healthcare systems that lack access to specialty care and other resources.

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CVO | Healthcare Provider Credentialing

Major Challenges Implementing FPPE

By: Tracey Meyer
May 9th, 2016

Let’s face it, regulating clinical privileges can have a major impact on the quality of care provided by healthcare facilities and their physicians. The Joint Commission (TJC) developed the Focused Professional Practice Evaluation (FPPE) and the Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluation (OPPE) as objective standards for the fair assessment of physicians.

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